Bar Admissions
  • California, 2013
  • Nevada, 2011
Education
  • J.D., University of San Diego, School of Law, 2011
  • B.S., Business Administration, University of Nebraska, 2006
  • B.A., Economics and Political Science, University of Nebraska, 2006
Bar Admissions
  • California, 2013
  • Nevada, 2011
Education
  • J.D., University of San Diego, School of Law, 2011
  • B.S., Business Administration, University of Nebraska, 2006
  • B.A., Economics and Political Science, University of Nebraska, 2006

Professional Background

Rory’s practice is focused on the representation of clients in complex civil matters.

Rory Kay attended the University of Nebraska, graduating in 2006 with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Political Science.  Mr. Kay continued his education at the University of San Diego School of Law, graduating in 2011.

During law school, Mr. Kay was Lead Articles Editor of the San Diego Law Review and a National Team Member of the University of San Diego Moot Court program.  He was one of only three graduates in the Class of 2011 to serve on the executive boards of both the San Diego Law Review and San Diego Moot Court.

Before joining McDonald Carano, Mr. Kay worked as a law clerk at The Law Firm of Hogue/Belong in San Diego, where he conducted legal research for cases involving wrongful termination, harassment and discrimination, and wage and hour violations. In this role, he gained experience obtaining information for discovery purposes and drafting documents for civil litigation.

Mr. Kay also worked as a research assistant for Professor Orly Lobel in the areas of employment intellectual property (EIP), non-competition agreements, and employer trade secrets.  He gathered data regarding labor migration and employee innovation and emerging legal trends and issues in the area of EIP.

Community Engagement

Boy Scouts Volunteer

ASUN Racial Affairs Advisory Council

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